Project

Stand Up, Stay Top! Tackling sedentary behavior in older adults through a feedback-based intervention

Duration
01 October 2018 → 30 September 2020
Funding
Regional and community funding: Special Research Fund
Research disciplines
  • Medical and health sciences
    • Laboratory medicine
    • Palliative care and end-of-life care
    • Regenerative medicine
    • Other basic sciences
    • Laboratory medicine
    • Palliative care and end-of-life care
    • Regenerative medicine
    • Other clinical sciences
    • Other health sciences
    • Nursing
    • Other paramedical sciences
    • Laboratory medicine
    • Palliative care and end-of-life care
    • Regenerative medicine
    • Other translational sciences
    • Other medical and health sciences
Keywords
sedentary behavior, older adults
 
Project description

The population of older adults is expected to increase considerably in the coming decades. This increase poses a major public health challenge, as aging is associated with a reduction in physical and cognitive functioning and health-related quality-of-life.
Decreasing sedentary behavior – or sitting – might be a promising strategy to foster healthy aging. Yet, few interventions have targeted older adults’ sedentary behavior. Moreover, existing interventions were mostly based on cognitive theories. However, sedentary behavior is a habit that occurs through unconscious processes, and thus, an intervention based on conscious awareness of the automated behavior might yield better results.
Recently, monitors have been developed, providing visual and tactile feedback on people’s sedentary behavior. However, the potential of these monitors to affect older adults’ sedentary behavior has never been tested.
Consequently, a randomized controlled trial will be conducted to evaluate the short- and longterm intervention effects of continuous visual and tactile feedback – generated by a sedentary behavior monitor – on older adults’ sedentary behavior, and geriatric-related health outcomes.
Secondly, an implementation study will be conducted to facilitate the dissemination of the intervention, and to bridge the gap between experimental research and real-life practice. Results of the implementation study will be evaluated using the RE-AIM framework.