Project

Development of a generic platform for antigen and immune potentiator delivery via spray drying

Duration
01 October 2012 → 31 August 2016
Funding
Regional and community funding: Special Research Fund, Research Foundation - Flanders (FWO)
Research disciplines
  • Natural sciences
    • Microbiology
    • Systems biology
  • Medical and health sciences
    • Laboratory medicine
    • Microbiology
    • Palliative care and end-of-life care
    • Regenerative medicine
    • Other basic sciences
    • Laboratory medicine
    • Palliative care and end-of-life care
    • Regenerative medicine
    • Other clinical sciences
    • Other health sciences
    • Nursing
    • Other paramedical sciences
    • Laboratory medicine
    • Microbiology
    • Palliative care and end-of-life care
    • Regenerative medicine
    • Other translational sciences
    • Other medical and health sciences
Keywords
gene modulation antigen platform
 
Project description

For many insidious pathogens the classical vaccination approach of injecting attenuated
pathogens has failed. Subunit vaccines composed of recombinant antigens might provide an
attractive alternative but their effective deployment will require the development of adjuvants capable of activating cellular immune responses. An appealing approach to achieve this goal is the encapsulation of antigens and immune-stimulatory compounds in particulate carriers.
Particulates in the 0.1-10 μm size range mimic the dimensions of pathogens, making them far
better recognized by the immune system than soluble antigens. Moreover, particulate delivery systems reduce inflammatory side effects evoked by immune stimulatory compounds by
focussing their action onto antigen presenting cells. Formulating antigens and immune
stimulatory components - often having totally different physicochemical characteristics -
inside the same particulate carrier however poses a tremendous challenge to drug delivery
scientists, currently impeding the use of these delivery systems on the vaccine market. As a consequence, the major aim of this project is the development of an easy and versatile
formulation strategy, compatible with clinical scaling up and enabling the efficient
encapsulation of antigens and immune-stimulatory components. Achieving this might
contribute to the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against chronic
infectious diseases and cancers, which are currently poorly controlled.